Lily Beetle Advice

This question was asked by
Glenys –  

Hi, I am a lover of lilies but alas, so many succumb to the dreaded lily beetle. Apart from picking them off by hand which is never ending with the many that I grow, can you advise on any beetle resistant lilies and what sprays can be used/home made possibly, bearing in mind that I garden organically.

Thanks for your help, Glenys

You could try our lily beetle prevention spray which is environmentally friendly or you could make up your own garlic solution. Crush a whole corm of garlic in a small pan of boiling water. Allow to cool, strain and put in a small container in the fridge. When using, dilute three parts water to one part garlic solution. Spray often, every few days, especially when it has rained. There is a garlic product available in garden centres and stores, but this is a much cheaper alternative.

Lily beetle

The Hart Family

FAQ on growing lilies

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Lilies

How do I plant my lily bulbs?

Lilies are very hardy bulbs. They can tolerate very cold conditions but do not like to get wet. If planting in borders the soil must be free draining and preferably humus rich. Some lilies prefer acid soil, mainly Oriental lilies, and some prefer alkaline mainly Asiatic lilies. It is best to check which soil you have. When planting in pots or tubs you must make sure that they are kept moist but do not get waterlogged. Plant bulbs with 4-6″ (10-15cm) of soil above them. If planting in pots, plant 3 in a 10-14″ (25-35cm) pot, in a good-quality, peat-free, multi-purpose compost. John Innes No.3 is ideal for Lilies also. If it appears too dense, add some horticultural grit to improve drainage.

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Helpful tips on growing lilies

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Planting your lilies couldn’t be easier once you have chosen the right soil for the variety.

Simply plant with the growing tip pointing upwards and the roots below and cover the top of the bulb with 4-6” (10-15cm) of soil. 

If planting in pots, plant 3 bulbs in a 10-14” (25-35cm) ‘patio type’ pot. You can plant more in a larger pot or less in a smaller pot. It really depends on the display you would like to achieve. You can also stagger the planting, using different lilies to achieve different heights.

Which lilies are best for your garden

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Luscious Lilies for your garden pots or borders

Whether you’re a fan of scented or unscented; tall or short; subtle or bold colours, there’s a  lily for everyone. I often get asked how to choose a lily and I guess this is where I start…

Where are you thinking of planting your lilies?

Asiatic Lilies

Firstly, where would you like to grow your lilies? Pots or garden borders? If you’re planning on planting up your lily bulbs in pots for your patio (or making a pot feature around your garden), then the world is your oyster when it comes to lily choice. This is because different lilies like different soil types. Therefore, you can choose any lily and just mix up the right soil/compost for it. Lilies are generally happy in a good-quality, peat-free, multi-purpose compost. This leads me to the next question…

Lilium Majestic Joy

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Transplanting lily bulbs from pot to the garden

This question was asked by
Graham B

Hi
The area that i want to plant them is not ready yet. Some of the bulbs are shooting, can i plant them in 3-4 ltr pots now in a cold greenhouse, and when I’m ready carefully transplant them outside probably next month at the earliest. By the way arrived in perfect condition & well packed 10 out of 10.
Await your reply cheers Graham

Hi Graham
Thank you for your email – it’s great to hear your feedback.
Yes it will be absolutely fine to transfer your bulbs from a pot to the garden in a month’s time – just be careful not to damage the shoots when you transplant them.

The Hart Family

Help with deciding on scented lilies

This question was asked by
H. Cole

Hello i would like to order about four varieties of lilies but would like some suggestions on the most beautifully scented ones with very large flowers.

Thanks,

Henrietta

Hi Henriette

We have lots of varieties to choose from. The most scented lilies are the white oriental lilies.
Oriental Lilies
The whiter the flower the more fragrant it is as they attract the wildlife by their scent rather than colour.

Have you seen the roselilies? These are beautiful double-headed flowers and are highly scented also.
Roselilies
However, if you are after larger flower blooms, then the oriental trumpet lilies are the largest in size and height. These are called tree lilies due to their height. Nymph is a gorgeously scented lily:
Oriental Trumpet Lilies

The Hart Family

Scented Lily

This question was asked by
Jessica

I have several planters I would like to grow lilies in. Ideally they need to be very fragrant, no staking is preferable, something pink or purple to fit in with our scheme. Is there anything you would suggest please? Something we can leave in which will flower again next year too. Emphasis on the fragrance really, thanks.

Hi Jessica

If you would like scented lilies, then anything that says ‘Oriental’ in the variety is highly scented. The general rule of thumb is the whiter/lighter the flower, the more fragrant it is (as it attracts insects by its scent rather than colour). However, all oriental lilies have a lovely fragrance.
Please look at the following links for scented lilies, you can filter your search by colour by using the search engine at the top of the page:

Oriental Lilies
Oriental Lilies

Oriental Trumpet Lilies (taller varieties)
Oriental Trumpet Lilies

All lilies can be left outside during the winter and will flower year after year.

The Hart Family

Anouska lilies as a xmas gift

This question was asked by
Tony

Are you able to despatch lily bulbs pre Xmas, to form Xmas presents, i.e. receipt 2nd/3rd week Dec. I am interested in the lily Anouska

Hi

All our lilies are dispatched in February ready for planting. We do Gift Certificates if you wish to purchase one of those for a xmas present or you could pre-order your Anouska lilies as a gift and send a card with an image of the Anouska lilies enclosed letting them know what they will receive in February. You can enter the recipient’s name and address in the Shipping field.

The Hart Family

Oriental and trumpet lilies

This question was asked by
Robert M

I have lilies which have been grown in large tubs. The flowers have died off and the leaves are now starting to turn brown. Should I lift the bulb from the pots and store them over winter or leave them in the pots. The pots are quite large and heavy.Any advice will be appreciated

Thanks
Robert

Hi Robert

Leave the lilies where there are – they like a cold dormant phase over winter. Ensure there is plenty of drainage so the bulbs don’t get waterlogged.

Cut the flower head off and leave the foliage and stem to die back naturally. This can all be removed once it has turned brown and hollow.

The Hart Family

Roselilies

This question was asked by
JANE SPREE

I purchased rose lilies from you this year and more at Hampton Court last year – all have been grown in pots and stunning. I’m not sure how to care for them over the coming months – we live in Devon, so its comparatively mild.
Thanks for your help
jane

Hi there,
When the Lily has finished flowering, cut any seed heads back and allow the foliage to die back naturally. Do not be tempted to cut the stem back until stems becomes hollow and brown.
Lilies like a cold dormant phase throughout the winter so they don’t need lifting. However, do ensure they have adequate drainage and do not get waterlogged as this will cause the bulbs to rot.
If planting in pots, it may be an idea to tilt the pots on their side in the winter to prevent waterlog.
Hope this helps.

The Hart Family